new:Languages of the World/Materials 496  
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new: Comparative Graeco-Latin Sentence Syntax in view of the European Context. Antonín Bartoněk

A Grammar of Magar Kaike

Ambika Regmi
Tribhuvan University

This is a comprehensive description of Magar Kaike, a previously undescribed and endangered Tibeto-Burman language spoken by around 1000 Magar Kaike mainly in four villages, namely, Sahartara, Tupatara, Tarakot and Belawa/Lingdu within Sahartara Village Development Committee of Dolpa District, Midwestern Development Region of Nepal.

This grammar, organized into thirteen chapters, analyzes phonological and morphosyntactic features of the language and compares them with the characteristic structural features of the Tibeto-Burman languages from the typological perspective.

Magar Kaike, a tonal and consistently ergative language, is characterized by a complex verb agreement pattern referred to as conjunct-disjunct. It exhibits case-syncretism and inclusiveexclusive distinction. In Magar Kaike, reflexive is marked morphologically. It massively uses nominalization for a number of syntactic functions. In Magar Kaike, except first person patient, the human patient is also marked by the dative case, referred to as antidative. The relative clauses are formed mainly by nominalization by employing the gap strategy. It employs reduplication for the sequential constructions. Magar Kaike uses different morphosyntactic devices for the coherence of the clauses at the multi-propositional levels. The author, PhD in linguistics, is researcher in Linguistic Survey of Nepal (LinSuN), Central Department of Linguistics, Tribuvan University, Nepal. She has specialized in Tibeto-Burman linguistics, language documentation and sociolinguistic survey.

 
ISBN 9783862884933. Languages of the World/Materials 496. 209pp. 2013.



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Languages of the World/Materials 431
Mewari

Lakhan Gusain
Johns Hopkins University



This is a linguistic description of Mewari, a dialect of Rajasthani of Indo-Aryan family, spoken by about five million speakers in Rajsamand, Bhilwara, Udaipur, and Chittorgarh districts of Rajasthan state of India. It has SOV word order.
    This grammar includes chapters on phonology, morphology, syntax, and a sample text. Consonants, vowels, diphthongs and suprasegmentals have been discussed in the chapter of phonology. There are 31 consonant, 10 vowels, and 2 diphthongs in Mewari. Intonation is prominent. Dental fricative is replaced by glottal stop at initial and medial positions. Inflection and derivation have been discussed in the chapter of morphology. There are two numbers--singular and plural, two genders--masculine and feminine, and three cases--simple, oblique, and vocative. Case marking is partly inflectional and partly postpositional. Concord is of object-verb type. Nouns are declined according to their endings. Pronouns are inflected for number, person, and gender. There are tenses--present, past, and future; and four moods. Adjective are of two types--either ending in /-o/ or not ending in /-o/. Three participles are there--present, past, and prefect. Sentence types, simple and complex sentences including coordination and subordinat-ion are analyzed in the chapter of syntax. In the sample text, interlinear and free translations are provided with original text.


ISBN 9783895868290. Languages of the World/Materials 431. 80pp. 2013.